show

John Foster

Accidental Mysteries


Benjamin Franklin said: “lost time is never found again.” Einstein proved that time is relative. Clocks, watches and timepieces of all sorts tell us where we are within our 24-hour daily allotment of time. Once you use time, it is forever gone. The present becomes the past as fast as you experience it, it falls away held only by our memory and our now sophisticated ways to capture it. This week, I take a look at some man-made devices that keep us… on time.

Time
Bob Keeshan (Captain Kangaroo) and Bennye Gatteys from the television program Captain Kangaroo, 1959, with Grandfather Clock.

Time
Clock stopped at moment of Hiroshima impact.

Time
Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre; Melted clock, Cass Technical High School

Time
Image of peach radio by Cassia Beck.

Time
Custom, one-of-a-kind camera clocks from Van Dusen Clockworks.

Time
A 1950s Kit Cat clock.

Time
Self-taught artist Frank Jones, c. 1968-1969, Smithsonian American Art Museum

Time
1960s classic IBM Clock.

Time
Silent film star Harold Lloyd in “Safety First,” 1923.

Time
Detail from work by self-taught artist Adolf Wolfli (1864-1930).

Time
George Nelson mid-century clock by Knoll, 1950s.

Time
Nixie clock containing wire-mesh anode and multiple cathodes in the shape of numerals.

Time
U.S. Army military clock, manufactured by Chelsea Clock Company, c. 1920-1930.

Time
U.S. Government clock with 24-hour dial, manufactured by Chelsea Clock Company, c. 1920-1930.

Time
Group of simple mechanical school/industrial clocks, France, c. 1930

Time
Waltham dashboard car clock, simple form, nickel casing, American c. 1920

Time
Steampunk clock designed by Amahl Shukup, using a 1910 clockcase and found industrial parts.

Time
Single digit steampunk nixie clock.

Time
Diagram of a clock assembly.

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The time 11:11 seems to have meaning for many people.

Time
Burned room with clock at abandoned Emge Foods Plant in Fort Branch, Indiana.

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Vintage watch face by Newgate.

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Westclox Earth paperweight clock — 1936-1938

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1930s Ingersoll vintage “Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf” alarm clock

Posted in: Accidental Mysteries, Art, Culture, Photography, Product Design

Comment 1  |     |     |   Like 0  |   Tweet 0
Comments [1]
Love this article -- especially the Ingersoll alarm clock. How about John Harrison's maritime clock, which revolutionized both timekeeping and global navigation?

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/bf/H1_low_250.jpg/220px-H1_low_250.jpg)
pol
10.24.12
03:20



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