show

John Foster

Accidental Mysteries


Poison. Before the days of advanced science and forensics, poison was the quiet, preferred method of murder. In the early days of science, poisons were usually kept in colored glass bottles that were various hues of dark amber or cobalt blue, as an immediate warning to read the label. Some poison bottles were shaped like coffins, and a scarce few clay bottles have been found shaped like a human bone. Eventually, the skull and crossbones were adopted for labels ― the universal sign of death, in case someone could not read.

Poison
Have a very, merry Christmas with poison snow. Fun for the entire family.

Poison
Two poison bottles made from carnival glass, from Laurel714 photostream.

Poison
Poison bottles were often colors other than clear, to differentiate them for real medicine. (from Nic Dempsey’s photostream)

Poison
Brown or amber glass poison bottle from tmac02892’s photostream.

Poison
Cobalt blue coffin front bottle.

Poison
Bottom of same poison bottle, showing mark on bottom for the Maryland Glass Company.

Poison
The label notes that the product was Paregoric Elixir made by E. E. Hall & Co. of Wolverhampton (central England), used to “calm fretful children.”

Poison
Gorgeous set of three skull shaped poison bottles from the American Poison Bottle Collectors Association, collection of Joan Cabaniss.

Poison
A nice collection of poison bottles, from the American Poison Bottle Collectors Association, collection of Joan Cabaniss.

Poison
Eli Lilly amber poison bottles; corked, three-sided, embossed and ribbed.

Poison
Aqua-colored Martin’s poison bottle from England with a curious “U” bend in the shoulder.

Poison
Light blue coffin bottle with skull and crossbones, with “hobnails” and “hinges”.

Poison
Beautiful wood poison cabinet with skull and crossbones.

Poison
Bed bug poison.

Poison
Chloroform label, 19th century.

Poison
Gopher killer, made by Fort Dodge Chemical Company.

Poison
Various vintage poison labels.

Poison
Arsenic-based medicine, Wm. R. Warner & Co., about 1900. National Museum of American History, Behring Center, Smithsonian Institution.

Poison
Nineteenth century Chinese rat poison.

Posted in: Accidental Mysteries, Culture

Comment 1  |     |     |   Like 0  |   Tweet 0
Comments [1]
informative!!
ksu
11.05.12
11:12



Creative Opportunities
  • Twitter Facebook Google+
    Tumblr Pinterest RSS

    Design Observer
    social media à la carte
  • Newsletter signup

  • Design Jobs
    Observer Jobs Spotlight




Places Journal
Mail Chimp