Rising Currents exhibition, certain tropes of contemporary waterfront design immediately surfaced." /> Rising Currents exhibition, certain tropes of contemporary waterfront design immediately surfaced." />
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Alexandra Lange

In AN 02: As the Tide Turns


In Issue 02 of The Architect’s Newspaper (available online tomorrow), my take on MoMA’s Rising Currents exhibition. The architects involved presented their work to a surprisingly large crowd on January 9. Best quote:

Certain tropes of contemporary waterfront design immediately surfaced: walls are bad; wetlands are good. And each project seemed to have a farmer’s market, whether on a barge, repurposed railway terminus, or flupsy (a floating oyster incubator). Pavements, edges, parks, and vacant lots were all to be permeable. Food, bi-valve or vegetal, was to be grown at or on the water’s edge.

This project represents a real departure for MoMA: a formally amorphous, sustainability-oriented topic, younger architects, a non-competitive exhibition, an interactive component, and so on. The biggest news from the presentation was that the museum is thinking of a continuing series of urban, contemporary exhibitions — which can only be a good thing for NYC architecture culture.



Posted in: Museums

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Alexandra Lange Alexandra Lange is an architecture and design critic, and author of Writing about Architecture: Mastering the Language of Buildings and Cities. (Princeton Architectural Press, 2012). Her work has appeared in The Architect’s Newspaper, Architectural Record, Dwell, Metropolis, Print, New York Magazine and The New York Times.

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