Landscape

Rick Poynor
Exposure: American Hermit by Alec Soth
Alone in the great outdoors


Rick Poynor
Exposure: The Colossi of Memnon by Francis Bedford
Mysterious emanations from the desert



John Thackara
Food As A Commons
People go hungry not because of a shortage of production, but because the food available is too expensive, or they lack the land to grow it on. In California, the prototype of a combined social, political and technical solution has been launched which promises to unlock the food system crisis.


Alexandra Lange
Mariana Griswold Van Rensselaer, Freelancer
One of the incidental pleasures of Judith Major’s new book on pioneering architecture critic Mariana Griswold Van Rensselaer is the glimpse it gives into the life of a cultural journalist at the turn of the past century.


Alexandra Lange
A World of Paste and Paper
Today's obsession with digital renderings sparked two exhibitions that suggest a handmade, but far from quaint, corrective.


Rick Poynor
David Maisel and the Apocalyptic Sublime
David Maisel’s photographs are visions of the Earth as we have never seen it full of beauty and terror.



Observed
Change of State
"Change of State" — a site specific projection on the facade of the New Museum during Ideas City Festival, Saturday, May 4th, 2013.


Alexandra Lange
Portlandia + Timelessness
No better place to consider what looks timeless now than downtown Portland.



Observed
Flickr Collection of the Week: Signs of Pittsburgh
Bright cursive hope and rust-covered despair, sigils of titans and corner store shingles, the quick and the decaying done for, encomiums to vanished glory and the name of an immortal beer-and-a-shot bar.


Alexandra Lange
Patterns of Houston
How do you critique the urbanism of Houston? Look for patterns.


Rob Walker
What Are You Looking At?
The maps of the future will tell you what to look at. Sometimes, you should look elsewhere.


Rob Walker
13 Striking Landscape Fictions
Thirteen “landscape fictions,” photographs of the natural world — made distinctly unnatural.


Alexandra Lange
Hiking the Museum
Ennead Architects’ new Natural History Museum of Utah works to make natural history seem like the ongoing process of discovery that it is, layering geology and topography, paleontology and interactivity.


Rob Walker
Observational Instruments, Observed
Peeping at the Venue project's delightful gear, and Google's Seussian Trekker


Alexandra Lange
The Well-Tempered Environment
Water features, old trees, food trucks. Three elements of the architecture of outdoor civic life in North Texas.


Alexandra Lange
Decorating Brutalism: The Interiors of Kevin Roche
How do you decorate a brutalist building? For architect Kevin Roche, the answer was brown, mirrors, and trees.


Alexandra Lange
Lessons from the High Line
How can the High Line become a new paradigm, and not a dead end?



Barbara Flanagan
The Dissing of Summer Lawns
How one Californian was forced (and inspired) to exchange sod for low-water plants.


Alexandra Lange
Jane Austen, Landscape Architect
Trapped by a ha-ha: bad romance and good landscapes in Mansfield Park.


Alexandra Lange
Jane Austen, Architect?
Why is Austen next to Ballard on the Designers & Books lists?


Alexandra Lange
Muddying the Waters
Explore New York's watery edges with the graduating class at D-Crit.



Julie Lasky
DesigNYC, Round 2
Report on second round of pro bono design initiatives fostered by DesigNYC.



Jason Orton
Tinder Boxes




Hal Clifford, and Jason Houston
Stone River: The Passion of Jon Piasecki
Landscape architect Jon Piasecki, talks about nature, the woods, and a recent multi-year stone works project in New York State — Stone River



William Drenttel, and Jon Piasecki
The Stonework of Jon Piasecki
"Stone construction is one of the most enduring traces of human activity. Any effort to quarry, cut and stack it is one that requires a powerful incentive, extensive planning and specialized skill." The Stone River project of Jon Piasecki.



Justin Partyka
The East Anglians
Image from photographer Justin Partyka's series, The East Anglians, about the decline of rural culture in the UK.



Karrie Jacobs
A Thousand Points on Light: Part I
Debate between lighting designer Leni Schwendinger and Dark-Sky advocate Susan Harder about proper illumination of urban, suburban and rural environments.



Jason Orton
Going Coastal
Photo of Holliwell Point, Essex County, England by Jason Orton.



Observed | August 18

A stunning midnight walk through the neon-hued streets of Asian cities. [BV]

The knitted pink pussyhat, a pro-European Union poster campaign, and a lending library of protest banners have been named some of the best designs of the year by the Design Museum in London. [BV]

Did McDonalds leak the iPhone 8 design? [BV]


Observed | August 17

The Midwest visionaries who built the literal Home of Tomorrow in the 1930‘s were brothers. [BV]

Think your commute is bad? Real time schadenfreude: a transit map of the whole world. [BV]

Prince now has his own Pantone color, inspired by his custom-made Yamaha purple piano. [BV]


Observed | August 16

Sure, it’s sponsored content: but it’s in Popular Science! Design hawked as a bundle of mastery. [JH]

A geography Professor maps best eclipse-viewing locations to waffle proximity. For real. More here. [JH]

In Spain, one designer builds a secret studio under a bridge. [JH]


Observed | August 15

Not all cities have a budget for design, but Atlanta’s department of urban planning is showing why they should. [BV]

Hilarious recipe videos in the style of famous directors: Wes Anderson inspired smores, Tarantino inspired spaghetti and meatballs, Michael Bay inspired waffles and more. (via Jason Kottke) [BV]


Observed | August 14

Google’s incendiary diversity memo now has its own website. [JH]

Design = growth strategy: John Madea explains. [JH]

Type lost, type found: a lovely story. [JH]


Observed | August 11

Mary Lund Davis: architect, furniture designer, and champion of modernism in the Pacific Northwest. [BV]

America’s past time is more than just hot dogs and foul balls: Major league baseball has a long but little-known history of rebels, reformers, and radicals. [BV]

More on Calibrigate: Lucas de Groot responds! [MB]


Observed | August 10

Through Don Draper’s eyes: a tour of the Time & Life building of the 1960s. [BV]

MIT developed a fabric that can fold into origami-like shapes when inflated. [BV]

#TBT: The glory days of ‘80s metal magazines. [BV]


Observed | August 09

A European design company tried to make a case for the design appeal of the swastika before it was made infamous by the Nazi party. It failed. [JH]

Jessica Helfand on logo color choices: “If a solution only works in color, then it doesn’t really work. It doesn’t carry its weight.” [BV]

Land Rover’s design head Gerry McGovern hates how many cows have to suffer in order to realize his design goals, so he’s introducing some new alternatives—like wool. [JH]

A neuroscientist becomes a designer. [JH]


Observed | August 08

“History of the Typewriter as Recited by Michael Winslow” traces 88 years of typewriter sounds, from 1895 to 1983. You have to hear this. [BV]

The story of a town moved for New York City’s water system. [BV]

City of sprawl, city of neighborhoods. City of wealth and poverty, celebrity and anonymity. Photographing Los Angeles. [BV]


Observed | August 07

The most popular city in Russia is Santa Barbara. [MB]

For your Monday clicking pleasure: 50 insane grindhouse movie posters. [BV]

Is Dunkin’ Donuts contemplating a name change? [MB]



Jobs | August 20