Landscape

Rick Poynor
Exposure: American Hermit by Alec Soth
Alone in the great outdoors


Rick Poynor
Exposure: The Colossi of Memnon by Francis Bedford
Mysterious emanations from the desert



John Thackara
Food As A Commons
People go hungry not because of a shortage of production, but because the food available is too expensive, or they lack the land to grow it on. In California, the prototype of a combined social, political and technical solution has been launched which promises to unlock the food system crisis.


Alexandra Lange
Mariana Griswold Van Rensselaer, Freelancer
One of the incidental pleasures of Judith Major’s new book on pioneering architecture critic Mariana Griswold Van Rensselaer is the glimpse it gives into the life of a cultural journalist at the turn of the past century.


Alexandra Lange
A World of Paste and Paper
Today's obsession with digital renderings sparked two exhibitions that suggest a handmade, but far from quaint, corrective.


Rick Poynor
David Maisel and the Apocalyptic Sublime
David Maisel’s photographs are visions of the Earth as we have never seen it full of beauty and terror.



Observed
Change of State
"Change of State" — a site specific projection on the facade of the New Museum during Ideas City Festival, Saturday, May 4th, 2013.


Alexandra Lange
Portlandia + Timelessness
No better place to consider what looks timeless now than downtown Portland.



Observed
Flickr Collection of the Week: Signs of Pittsburgh
Bright cursive hope and rust-covered despair, sigils of titans and corner store shingles, the quick and the decaying done for, encomiums to vanished glory and the name of an immortal beer-and-a-shot bar.


Alexandra Lange
Patterns of Houston
How do you critique the urbanism of Houston? Look for patterns.


Rob Walker
What Are You Looking At?
The maps of the future will tell you what to look at. Sometimes, you should look elsewhere.


Rob Walker
13 Striking Landscape Fictions
Thirteen “landscape fictions,” photographs of the natural world — made distinctly unnatural.


Alexandra Lange
Hiking the Museum
Ennead Architects’ new Natural History Museum of Utah works to make natural history seem like the ongoing process of discovery that it is, layering geology and topography, paleontology and interactivity.


Rob Walker
Observational Instruments, Observed
Peeping at the Venue project's delightful gear, and Google's Seussian Trekker


Alexandra Lange
The Well-Tempered Environment
Water features, old trees, food trucks. Three elements of the architecture of outdoor civic life in North Texas.


Alexandra Lange
Decorating Brutalism: The Interiors of Kevin Roche
How do you decorate a brutalist building? For architect Kevin Roche, the answer was brown, mirrors, and trees.


Alexandra Lange
Lessons from the High Line
How can the High Line become a new paradigm, and not a dead end?



Barbara Flanagan
The Dissing of Summer Lawns
How one Californian was forced (and inspired) to exchange sod for low-water plants.


Alexandra Lange
Jane Austen, Landscape Architect
Trapped by a ha-ha: bad romance and good landscapes in Mansfield Park.


Alexandra Lange
Jane Austen, Architect?
Why is Austen next to Ballard on the Designers & Books lists?


Alexandra Lange
Muddying the Waters
Explore New York's watery edges with the graduating class at D-Crit.



Julie Lasky
DesigNYC, Round 2
Report on second round of pro bono design initiatives fostered by DesigNYC.



Jason Orton
Tinder Boxes




Hal Clifford, and Jason Houston
Stone River: The Passion of Jon Piasecki
Landscape architect Jon Piasecki, talks about nature, the woods, and a recent multi-year stone works project in New York State — Stone River



William Drenttel, and Jon Piasecki
The Stonework of Jon Piasecki
"Stone construction is one of the most enduring traces of human activity. Any effort to quarry, cut and stack it is one that requires a powerful incentive, extensive planning and specialized skill." The Stone River project of Jon Piasecki.



Justin Partyka
The East Anglians
Image from photographer Justin Partyka's series, The East Anglians, about the decline of rural culture in the UK.



Karrie Jacobs
A Thousand Points on Light: Part I
Debate between lighting designer Leni Schwendinger and Dark-Sky advocate Susan Harder about proper illumination of urban, suburban and rural environments.



Jason Orton
Going Coastal
Photo of Holliwell Point, Essex County, England by Jason Orton.



Observed | June 28

It‘s officially summer. Time to tip your hat to Robert Moses, whose first public-works project was Jones Beach. [BV]

Brooklyn-based multimedia artist Anthony Goicolea’s monument to honor the victims of the Orlando shooting is unveiled in New York. [JH]

Feathered hair, loopy patterns, and color combinations you forgot were even remotely possible: 80’s design, Memphis-style. [JH]

“And it has two exclamation points. Time headlines don’t yell.” Deconstructing a fake magazine cover in the Trump era. [JH]


Observed | June 27

City Lab announces what sounds like a serious redesign, yet fails to mention the re-designer. Ouch. [JH]

What is lost when we forget how to draw by hand? [MB]

Former Yale School of Art Dean, photographic pioneer and MacArthur recipient Richard Benson has died at 74. Tod Papageorge’s appreciation is here. A New Yorker profile on Benson appeared in 1990. Subscribers can download it in its entirety on their site. [JH]

The ultimate jargon-free design contract. [MB]


Observed | June 26

Over six billion emojis are sent on a daily basis: how pictographs convey emotion. Read more: [JH]

“Because after all of this, I’m still left wondering what design actually is.” One review of the Cannes Lions awards. [JH]

Posters for change: deadline extended to June 30. [JH]


Observed | June 23

Not sure I agree, but an article in the Financial Times suggests design thinking is an essential part of every business student’s education. [JH]

When signage fails. [JH]

Is design a respite from chaos? [JH]


Observed | June 22

Former Exploratorium Art Director Diane Burk is taking a design sabbatical: follow her amazing travels here. [JH]

Typographic perfection? Patrick King’s witty (and well-kerned) t-shirt collection is just what your summer wardrobe needs. [JH]

Typographic nightmare? Spoiler alert: it’s not Comic Sans! [JH]


Observed | June 21

This year’s Serpentine Pavillion, designed by the extraordinary Frances Kere. [MB]

How Comic Sans became the world’s most notorious font. (Thanks to Karen Day.) [MB]

Fold your way through Frank Lloyd Wright’s most famous buildings. [BV]

A 257-Year-Old coloring book was discovered in St. Louis. [BV]


Observed | June 20

Accidental Wes Anderson locations, a very colorful and surreal subreddit. [BV]

Robots in art class. [MPL]

The internet is for circles. [MB]

Subtle ways to signal wealth: not designer bags anymore. [MPL]

A sociology of the smartphone. [MB]


Observed | June 19

Rob Walker‘s insightful (and beautifully written) assessment of the importance of the logo. [JH]

“In the visual clamor of a bookstore, the important thing is to be different.” From 2005, John Updike on book cover design. [MB]

IKEA’s posters help you cook dinner. (But what about a soup?) [MPL]

Great assessment by Rick Poynor of the enduring relevance of Emigre magazine. [MB]



Jobs | June 29