Nature

Rick Poynor
Exposure: Chimpanzee by James Mollison
Looking into the face of an ape



Sara Jamshidi
The Tree
Three perspectives



John Thackara
Food As A Commons
People go hungry not because of a shortage of production, but because the food available is too expensive, or they lack the land to grow it on. In California, the prototype of a combined social, political and technical solution has been launched which promises to unlock the food system crisis.


Alexandra Lange
Mariana Griswold Van Rensselaer, Freelancer
One of the incidental pleasures of Judith Major’s new book on pioneering architecture critic Mariana Griswold Van Rensselaer is the glimpse it gives into the life of a cultural journalist at the turn of the past century.


Alexandra Lange
Someone Else’s Shangri La
An exhibition of Doris Duke's Honolulu mansion, Shangri La, proves a “Spanish-Moorish-Persian-Indian complex” works as theater.


Alexandra Lange
Hiking the Museum
Ennead Architects’ new Natural History Museum of Utah works to make natural history seem like the ongoing process of discovery that it is, layering geology and topography, paleontology and interactivity.


Rick Poynor
On My Screen: The Back of Beyond
John Heyer’s The Back of Beyond, made for Shell Australia in 1954, is one of the country’s finest films.


John Thackara
Utopia is Here
Ridley Scott's film Blade Runner, made in 1982, portrays a dystopian Los Angeles as it might be in 2019. In just eight years we are due to find out whether or not the film was an accurate prediction.



Adam Harrison Levy
Sustainable Christmas Trees
From artificial firs to rented spruces, a report on alternatives to the chopped-down Xmas tree.






William Drenttel, and Jon Piasecki
The Stonework of Jon Piasecki
"Stone construction is one of the most enduring traces of human activity. Any effort to quarry, cut and stack it is one that requires a powerful incentive, extensive planning and specialized skill." The Stone River project of Jon Piasecki.



Mark Dery
Paradise Fouled
Review of Crude, Joe Berlinger's documentary film about a lawsuit filed against Chevron by denizens of the Ecuadorean Amazon.



Karrie Jacobs
A Thousand Points on Light: Part II
Continuation of debate between lighting designer Leni Schwendinger and Dark-Sky advocate Susan Harder about proper illumination of urban, suburban and rural environments.



Karrie Jacobs
A Thousand Points on Light: Part I
Debate between lighting designer Leni Schwendinger and Dark-Sky advocate Susan Harder about proper illumination of urban, suburban and rural environments.



Observed | June 27

City Lab announces what sounds like a serious redesign, yet fails to mention the re-designer. Ouch. [MB]

What is lost when we forget how to draw by hand? [MB]

Former Yale School of Art Dean, photographic pioneer and MacArthur recipient Richard Benson has died at 74. Tod Papageorge’s appreciation is here. A New Yorker profile on Benson appeared in 1990. Subscribers can download it in its entirety on their site. [JH]

The ultimate jargon-free design contract. [MB]


Observed | June 26

Over six billion emojis are sent on a daily basis: how pictographs convey emotion. Read more: [JH]

“Because after all of this, I’m still left wondering what design actually is.” One review of the Cannes Lions awards. [JH]

Posters for change: deadline extended to June 30. [JH]


Observed | June 23

Not sure I agree, but an article in the Financial Times suggests design thinking is an essential part of every business student’s education. [JH]

When signage fails. [JH]

Is design a respite from chaos? [JH]


Observed | June 22

Former Exploratorium Art Director Diane Burk is taking a design sabbatical: follow her amazing travels here. [JH]

Typographic perfection? Patrick King’s witty (and well-kerned) t-shirt collection is just what your summer wardrobe needs. [JH]

Typographic nightmare? Spoiler alert: it’s not Comic Sans! [JH]


Observed | June 21

This year’s Serpentine Pavillion, designed by the extraordinary Frances Kere. [MB]

How Comic Sans became the world’s most notorious font. (Thanks to Karen Day.) [MB]

Fold your way through Frank Lloyd Wright’s most famous buildings. [BV]

A 257-Year-Old coloring book was discovered in St. Louis. [BV]


Observed | June 20

Accidental Wes Anderson locations, a very colorful and surreal subreddit. [BV]

Robots in art class. [MPL]

The internet is for circles. [MB]

Subtle ways to signal wealth: not designer bags anymore. [MPL]

A sociology of the smartphone. [MB]


Observed | June 19

Rob Walker‘s insightful (and beautifully written) assessment of the importance of the logo. [JH]

“In the visual clamor of a bookstore, the important thing is to be different.” From 2005, John Updike on book cover design. [MB]

IKEA’s posters help you cook dinner. (But what about a soup?) [MPL]

Great assessment by Rick Poynor of the enduring relevance of Emigre magazine. [MB]

Animations that reveal the differences between subway maps and their actual geography. [MB]


Observed | June 16

Anti-Tiger mother strategy (helps) lead to brilliant creative student accepted everywhere! [JH]

Was the design of One World Trade Center a rip-off? [JH]


Observed | June 15

Our very own Jessica Helfand want to start conversations—meaningful ones—with you. Listen! [JH]



Jobs | June 27