2011 | 50 Covers Selections

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2011 Covers

AIGA Archives
3001: A Lunar Odyssey
Mike Uphoff
(Lulu)

A Man of Parts
David Lodge
(Viking)

A Relíquia (Relic); A Queda de um Anjo (The Fall of an Angel); De Profundis (De Profundis); ; Coração (Heart)
Célia Pessegueiro
(Nova Delphi)

Adam and Evelyn
Ingo Schulze
(Alfred A. Knopf)

Adventures in the Orgasmatron
Christopher Turner
(Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

Bed
David Whitehouse
(Scribner)

Better By Mistake
Alina Tugend
(Riverhead Books)

Black Boy White School
Brian F. Walker
(HarperCollins Children's Books)

C
Tom McCarthy
(Vintage Books)

Checking In/Checking Out
Chris Schaberg/Mark Yakich
(NO Books)

Contradance
John Peck
(The University of Chicago Press)

Darwin's Finches
Edited, with Commentary, by Kathleen Donohue
(The University of Chicago Press)

Death and the Penguin
Andrey Kurkov
(Melville House)

Debt
David Graeber
(Melville House)

Do the Movies Have a Future
David Denby
(Simon & Schuster)

Fever
Sonia Shah
(Picador)

He Died with His Eyes Open
Derek Raymond
(Melville House)

I Belong to This Band, Hallelujah!
Laura Clawson
(The University of Chicago Press)

I Know I Am But What Are You?
Samantha Bee
(Gallery Books)

In Trouble
Ellen Levine
(Carolrhoda Lab, an imprint of Lerner Publishing group)

Influencing Machine
Author: Brooke Gladstone / Josh Neufeld; Editor: Tom Mayer
(W. W. Norton & Company)

IQ84
Haruki Murakami
(Random House)

Kerouac Series (2011 REPACKAGE)
Jack Kerouac
(Penguin Group (USA))

Kwadraat Bladen A series of graphic experiments 1955—74
Adrian Shaughnessy and Tony Brook
(Unit Editions)

Linguagem e Comunicação (Language and Communication) from the book series Celga.
Paula Valente
(Almedina)

Londoners
Craig Taylor
(Granta)

Mensagem de Fernando Pessoa (The Message of Fernando Pessoa)
Paula Valente
(Almedina)

My Dyslexia
Philip Schultz
(W. W. Norton & Company)

Nom de Plume
Carmela Ciuraru
(Harper Collins)

Oliver Sacks paperback repackage (Migrane; Awakenings; The Island of the Colorblind; Uncle Tugnsten; An Anthropologist on Mars; Seeing Voices)
Oliver Sacks
(Vintage)

Operation Bonnet: A Novel
Kimberly Stuart
(David C. Cook)

Orientation and Other Stories
Daniel Orozco
(Faber and Faber)

Poetry After 9/11
Dennis Loy Johnson and Valerie Merians
(Melville House)

Red Autobiographies
Igal Halfin
(University of Washington Press)

Seeing Double
Françoise Meltzer
(The University of Chicago Press)

Snowdrops
A.D. Miller
(Doubleday)

Tell the Wolves I’m Home
Carol Rifka Brunt
(Random House)

The Bauhaus Group
Nicholas Fox Weber
(Yale University Press)

The Enigma of the Aerofoil
David Bloor
(The University of Chicago Press)

The Information: A History, A Theory, A FLood
James Gleick
(Pantheon)

The Meaning of Disgust
Colin McGinn
(Oxford University Press)

The Next Hundred Million: America in 2050
Joel Kotkin
(Penguin)

The Old Romantic
Louise Dean
(Riverhead Books)

The Pale King
David Foster Wallace
(Hamish Hamilton)

The Pint Man
Steve Rushin
(Vintage Books)

The Real Holden Caulfield
Michael Moats
(Fiction Advocate)

The Works of Franz Kafka
F. Kafka
(Schocken Books)

Tourquai
Tim Davys
(Harper Collins)

Vault
David Rose
(Salt Publishing)

Works of Clarice Lispector
Clarice Lispector
(New Directions)




Observed | June 22

In partnership with over 30 museums and institutions from around the world, Google Arts & Culture has launched Faces of Frida, a massive collection of art, letters, essays, videos, and other artifacts about the life and work of Frida Kahlo. (via Kottke.org) [BV]


Observed | June 21

Can design help New York City go zero waste? [BV]

Despite modernism being recognised as an important architectural movement in the UK, many examples have been demolished. Here‘s an illustrated tribute to lost modernist buildings. [BV]

Today’s rainbow-colored logos reflect the joy and optimism inherent in the rainbow in a multitude of new expressions. [BV]


Observed | June 19

How punk rock changed the course of design history. [BV]

Adobe is releasing five fonts based on designs by Bauhaus figures, “lost to history”, which have been revived by German typographer Erik Spiekermann and a group of students. [BV]


Observed | June 14

The history of the 1940 Emeco 10-06 Navy Chair, made of bent aluminum, and strong enough to withstand an 8-story drop from a Chicago window. [BV]


Observed | June 13

Massimo Vignelli’s unused maps for the D.C. Metro are amazing. [BV]

A tale of two hats from Steven Heller. [BV]


Observed | June 12

About two years ago Brooklyn-based polymath Robby Kraft started using algorithmic code to design new origami patterns and they are astounding. [BV]

Herb Lubalin was born 100 years ago. To celebrate, join in to republish Herb Lubalin: American Graphic Designer (1918-81). [BV]


Observed | June 11

Super freaky recently declassified NSA security posters. Seriously. [BV]


Observed | June 07

Encyclopædia Britannica wants to fix false Google results with actual facts. [BV]


Observed | June 06

“Working with children, after all, was the rare field in which women’s gender was seen as an asset rather than an obstacle. As children gained their own spaces, their own toys, and their own diminutive furniture, beginning in the nineteenth century, refining, proselytizing, and testing designs meant for children was women’s work. We see their influence everywhere.” Alexandra Lange on the hidden women of architecture and design. [BV]


Observed | June 04

Lab100 is a new type of medical clinic that will use data science to predict and prevent medical conditions instead of diagnosing and treating issues after-the-fact. [BV]

What if your surroundings never went in the garbage? Taking recycling to the next level. [BV]

What New York can learn from Europe about designing a city for people instead of cars. [MB]


Observed | June 01

Jaron Lanier was there for the creation of the internet and is convinced that social media is toxic, making us sadder, angrier, and more isolated. [BV]


Observed | May 31

#TBT: The retro-futuristic movie posters of Laurent Durieux. [BV]


Observed | May 30

What happens when speculative design goes corporate?...At its most disturbing, it’s a way of giving a company’s employees permission to think the unthinkable—to grapple with how omniscient and powerful that corporate entity might become. [BV]

An explainer video from 1923—when films were still silent and the discovery of Pluto was 7 years in the future—about Einstein’s theory of relativity. [BV]


Observed | May 29

Arbys wants you to download their font, Saucy_AF, to “say it with sauce”. [BV]

It wasn’t until the 1990s that public libraries realized their most loyal patrons were teens—and started giving them room to act like teens. Alexandra Lange explores young adult architecture. [BV]


Observed | May 28

Meghan Markle has been granted her own coat of arms; its design was approved by the Queen. (via James I. Bowie) [BV]


Observed | May 24

“Design in this century has little use for anything that can’t be quantified. And yet, here is Apple’s App Store, presenting new, original illustrations several times a week.” [BV]


Observed | May 23

Bill Gold, the seminal designer who created posters for some of Hollywood‘s most famous movies—from A Streetcar Named Desire to The Exorcist—has died. [LS]

Pilot and photographer Christiaan van Heijst captures his stunning view of weather from the cockpit. [BV]

Goodbye Philip Roth, designer manqué. [BV]


Observed | May 22

Sadly we must say goodbye to Robert Indiana, who brought his world-famous LOVE sculpture to NYC in 1971. [BV]

Adherents to Design Thinking believe it will save higher ed. Are they delusional? [BV]



Jobs | June 23