Bonnie Siegler is an award-winning graphic designer. She is the founder of Eight and a Half, a multidisciplinary design studio based in New York, and before that, was the co-founder of Number Seventeen. She got her degree at Carnegie Mellon University, has taught in the graduate design programs at Yale University, RISD, and the School of Visual Arts and was the 2014 Koopman Distinguished Chair in the Visual Arts at the University of Hartford.















































































Observed | September 23

The reason your neighborhood increasingly resembles a boring shopping mall is because somebody’s banker prefers it that way [MB]

A pantheon of record sleeve designers pick their favorites. [MB]

Molly Young and Teddy Blanks team up to produce a periodic table of NYC trash. [JH]

The Financial Times, on the comfort—and value—of Gerrit Rietveld’s classic zig-zag chair. [JH]

A new book suggests that design is at the core of all innovation. [JH]

90% of information transmitted to the brain is visual, and visual content is processed 60,000 times faster than text. [JH]

“In just a few years, understanding programming will be an indispensable part of active citizenship.” Reflections on the ethical dimensions of coding. [JH]


Observed | September 22

Farewell, Rollo Tamasi. Remembering the remarkably versatile director Curtis Hanson and his best movie, L.A. Confidential. [MB]

“Design to me is about improving our daily life—it is not about creating another lamp or another chair.” Dutch designer Daan Roosegaarde wins the design innovation medal in London. [JH]

A deepening interest in helping to define what design in China actually means. [JH]

The EpiPen is just one more example in a long tradition of designers “solving” design problems by adding instructions, rather than fixing the underlying design itself. [JH]

TestLab Berlin—an immersive design program from ArtCenter in California. [JH]

The art schools Fidel Castro built—and then neglected. [MB]


Observed | September 21

In December, DC Comics and IDW Publishing will publish “Love Is Love,” a 144-page comic book whose proceeds will benefit Equality Florida and its fund for those affected by the June 12 attack at the Pulse nightclub in Florida. [JH]

Disney characters with a military aesthetic: painting as propaganda in (North!) Korea. [JH]

Can you get a patent for a paper bag? Apple can! [JH]

Valued at $246 billion, Tencent is Asia’s most profitable company. Here’s what went into designing their corporate headquarters. [JH]


Observed | September 20

“Design/Build” and why it’s good for everyone, especially the economy. [JH]

A new book brilliantly exposes the often overlooked relationship between architecture and the political process. [JH]

Frank Gehry redesigns Eisenhower memorial after a now-well publicized family critique. [JH]

Kickstarter projects, city by city, illuminate where creative communities live in the United States. [JH]

All 14 issues of legendary Herb Lubalin 60s magazine Avant Garde are now online! [JH]


Observed | September 19

Taschen’s new luscious book on vintage car brochures. [JH]

"Its participatory nature, in which viewers are invited to make use of the fixture individually and privately, allows for an experience of unprecedented intimacy with a work of art.” Artist Maurizio Catalan has replaced the toilet in a public restroom at the Guggenheim Museum with a fully functional replica cast in 18-karat gold. [MB]

New Zealand student designs inflatable bird bath with implications for combating oil spills worldwide. [JH]

At the University of Nevada in Las Vegas, you can now get a degree in health care interior design. Here’s why. [JH]

"At fifteen seconds after 9:41 a.m., on September 11, 2001, a photographer named Richard Drew took a picture of a man falling through the sky—falling through time as well as through space. The picture went all around the world, and then disappeared, as if we willed it away.” A masterful piece by Tom Junod on one of most famous — and horrifying — pictures from 9/11. [MB]

As Solari boards disappear from train stations and airports, they’re showing up elsewhere. [MB]

Design “weeks” is now a global thing—and coming to a country near you! [JH]

Stephen Wolfram on how to teach computational thinking. (Thanks to Blake Eskin.) [MB]



Jobs | September 25