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Observed | January 07

“It seems to me that designers, bringing evermore astonishing prowess to bear, too often outshine the work they are meant to support.” Another pitch-perfect review by Jesse Green. [JH]

Design and the Chinese bookstore: a saga! (h/t to Jen Renninger) [JH]

From Mad magazine to B-Movies: An Oral History of Beastie Boys’ Artwork. [BV]


Observed | December 30

Book jackets as optical echoes. [JH]

Design and Healing, a new exhibition at Cooper Hewitt in New York, “helps us appreciate optimism amid hopelessness, and celebrates extraordinary accomplishments under duress”. [JH]

The long read: Craig L. Wilkins on the questionable role of the architectural biennial. [JH]

Why is a typeface named Jim Crow? (via Mike Errico.) [JH]


Observed | December 23

“It’s something that should have been caught in the design phase.” [JH]

A beautiful roundup of forty years of MTV logos, from our friends at It’s Nice That. [JH]

Broken covers: Steve Goldman puts the world’s worst album art on show.[BV]


Observed | December 17

Redesigning the euro—by 2024! [JH]

Brad Pitt, design obsessive, takes on his latest project, in France. [JH]

Design at Apple in the post-Jony Ive era. [JH]

We normally avoid any incoming news item labeled “trends to watch” but there are actually some lovely things in here. ’Tis the season to look at ... beer labels! [JH]

La Patria is a robust online archive of Uruguayan design that includes posters, postage stamps. book and record covers, and more. [JH]


Observed | December 10

Design and traffic. [JH]

In Ghana, a model for design, education, community—and sustainability. [JH]

Insecure—the acclaimed HBO series—makes costume design history. [JH]

Ritesh Gupta launches Useful School, a pay-what-you-can online design curriculum for people of color. [BV]

Spotify Wrapped: a design-cautionary tale. [JH]


Observed | November 26

Dave Hickey, the author of Air Guitar and The Invisible Dragon, has died. The influential art and cultural critic was 82. [JH]

Rethinking design—as a transformative catalyst for change—in the circular economy. [JH]


Observed | November 15

Bob Gill, “bomb-throwing revolutionary”“, “polemicist”, and, yes, the important and influential graphic designer, dies at 90. [JH]

Who designs the city? A compelling, inclusive, and actionable inquiry. [JH]

All hail the mighty ... typewriter! [JH]


Observed | November 12

Periplus* Workshops, offers a new and unique opportunity for emerging designers to respond to nature in the rural and ancient Mani Region, near Kalamata, in Greece. [JH]

A new retrospective of Barbara Kruger’s “endlessly hashtaggable” work opens at the Art Institute of Chicago. [JH]


Observed | November 05

Inspired? Revolutionary? Or just batshit crazy? A consulting architect on a proposed new dormitory at the University of California Santa Barbara claims its design premise is "unsupportable from my perspective as an architect, a parent, and a human being". [JH]

If you think you’re not part of this well-oiled machine of excess—and its dark underbelly—you’re wrong. (Don’t miss the Swedish teapot man.) [JH]



Jobs | January 19