Science

Pamela Worth
Three Billboards Outside New Haven
Hope for the best. Vote for science.


Melissa Leone
Celestial Bodies
Man’s age-old fascination with the celestial has created countless beautiful—albeit not always accurate—diagrams of the universe.


Melissa Leone
Microbial Illustrations
Illustrated versions of the microscopic designs that make up our world.


Melissa Leone
British Mineralogy
Colored figures intended to elucidate the mineralogy of Great Britain


Kathleen Meaney
Wing It: Testing Out Exhibit Design Using Virtual Reality
The field of environmental (or experiential) graphic design is young and on fire.


Michael Bierut
The Typeface of Truth
What are the implications when Errol Morris declares the typeface most likely to induce credulity is Baskerville?


Rick Poynor
Exposure: Mrs. E.N. Todter by Dion & Puett Studio
Art and the Ladies’ Field Club


Rick Poynor
The Body as Factory: Anatomy of an Image
Peeling back the skin of a New Scientist cover illustration by Nichola Bruce and Michael Coulson.



Observed
A Sculpture on the Moon
Slate has a fascinating article about artist Paul van Hoeydonck and his three-and-a-half inch scultpure, Fallen Astronaut that was (and still is) exhibited on the moon.


Alexandra Lange
Hiking the Museum
Ennead Architects’ new Natural History Museum of Utah works to make natural history seem like the ongoing process of discovery that it is, layering geology and topography, paleontology and interactivity.


Alexandra Lange
Science Gets Around to Architecture
Why are we still privileging scientific studies over visual thinking?



Rob Walker
On Radiolab: the Sound of Science
“Radiolab,” a public radio show that breaks from public radio sensibilities, not least in its striking sound.



Carl Schoonover
Portraits of the Mind
The book, Portraits of the Mind: Visualizing the Brain from Antiquity to the 21st Century (Abrams) documents this overlooked dimension over two millennia of obsession with the brain.



Michael Bierut
Designing the Unthinkable
For more than fifty years, there have been arguments against nuclear proliferation. The Doomsday Clock translates all the arguments to a simple visual analogy.



The Editors
And Speaking of Sustainability...
Proceedings of a 2003 seminar about Timeship, a visionary project designed by Stephen Valentine for storing the frozen remains of people awaiting reanimation.



Alan Rapp
Personal Space
Robert Sommer’s Personal Space: The Behavioral Basis of Design was published in forty years ago, and its compact title concept — an invisible but perceptible security zone surrounding an individual — caught on. But where is Sommer now? A recent study in Perception finds that listening to music on headphones alters our sense of sociospatial relations. Until these more contemporary strands of inquiry result in a truly new analysis of how we perceive our interpersonal zones today, Personal Space is now available in a new edition, with some additional commentary by Dr. Sommer, from Bosko Books in the UK



Mark Lamster
Triumph of the Will (Or, Everything Old Is New Again)
In the New Yorker this week, Jonah Lehrer writes about a psychological study suggesting that self control, or the ability to delay gratification, more strongly correlates with long-term success than intelligence.



Lorraine Wild
Will Burtin: Design and Science
Will Burtin’s story is presented in Design and Science: The Life and Work of Will Burtin. Like all of the emigré “pioneers,” Burtin brought an amazing amount of talent and energy (along with plain old ambition) to his modernist approach.



Debbie Millman
Jonah Lehrer
Jonah Lehrer, editor-at-large for Seed Magazine, is also a contributor to NPR’s RadioLab. He is the author of Proust was a Neuroscientist.



Debbie Millman
Eric Kandel
Nobel prize winner Eric Kandel is a psychiatrist, neuroscientist and professor of biochemistry and biophysics at Columbia University.
 




Jessica Helfand
Science and Design: The Next Wave
Scientists probe and manipulate and channel and divide; they split and fuse and spike and engineer; but most of all, they look. As a designer, to spend any time with scientists is to become at once profoundly aware of our similarities and devastated by that which divides us.



Jessica Helfand
My Dirty Little Secret
Gardening is its own infuriating design challenge. You fret and you rethink and you second-guess yourself constantly, and then for one delirious, thrilling moment something blooms and you feel utterly triumphant. And then it dies and you are back where you started.



William Drenttel
International Polar Year
In what may turn out to be the biggest international scientific project to date, an army of thousands of scientists will spend the next two years studying the Arctic and Antarctic as part of the International Polar Year, which officially begins this week.



Jessica Helfand
Death 'N' Stuff
Smoking Kills: The label days it all. Or does it? Once the allegedly chilling skull and crossbones is marketed as a decorative pattern
on a silk bowtie, its credibility as an mark of peril seems, well, somewhat questionable, begging the question: have we become so bored by life that we've inadvertently become inured to death?



William Drenttel
Threat Advisory Pandemic Alert System (TAPAS)
How do we measure the danger level from the Avian Influenza A (H5N1) virus? What we lack is that one Tom Ridge-like bit of inspiration that would lend clarity to these confusing times. We took our cue from a certain John James Audubon. Herewith, one option for Homeland Security. Yes, we know: it's for the birds.



William Drenttel
Weather Report: 53 Degrees F. Heavy Snowfall Predicted
The weather is fucked up. "Science is a way of making sense of the world. Design is a way of making the world make sense."



Jessica Helfand
Face Value
Facial transplants mapping our future: how much is the world of design responsible?



William Drenttel
Maps of Cyberspace
It is the internet that has changed our perception of space, precisely because the sheer volume of interconnectivity is beyond our imagination, whether it be language-based, data-based, or community-based. Add black holes and photographs of asteroidal moons around Jupiter, and our world seems increasingly expansive. Yet, if we cannot map it, how can we understand it?



Jessica Helfand
Greer Allen: In Memoriam
Designer, critic, pundit and historian, Greer Allen was Senior Critic in Graphic Design at Yale School of Art. He designed publications for The Houghton Library at Harvard, the Beinecke Library at Yale, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and a number of other distinguished cultural institutions around the country. Greer Allen died last week after a short illness. He was 83.



Rick Poynor
Eduardo Paolozzi, 20th Century Image-Maker
If a visual artist created more concentrated, exhilarating images of science, technology and the media realm during the mid-20th century than British artist Eduardo Paolozzi, then I would like to see them. Paolozzi, who died on 22 April aged 81, was first of all a sculptor, but the screenprints he produced in the 1960s rank as masterpieces of the medium.



The Editors
Understanding and Action




Jessica Helfand
Under The Microscope




William Drenttel
Edward Tufte: The Dispassionate Statistician III




Jessica Helfand
Take Two Logos and Call Me in the Morning




Jessica Helfand
One Person, One Vote, One MRI?




Jessica Helfand
Annals of Typographic Oddity No. 2: Spaceship Gothic




William Drenttel
Call for Entries: Periodic Table of the Elements
Jessica Helfand and I are building a collection of Periodic Tables and hope to publish a book on their scientific, visual and cultural history.



William Drenttel
Uut, Uup and Away
What happens when we discover new elements, especially ones on the outer fringes of the periodic table? Where did Uut and Uup come from?



Observed | September 19

Remembering the Village Voice: Drugs delivered to the office, back stabbings, headlocks... [BV]

A brief history of product sound design. (via Blake Eskin) [BV]


Observed | September 18

We know music is pleasurable, but it’s incredibly difficult to discern just how this comes to pass. [BV]


Observed | September 14

Extraordinary gas stations From John Margolies’ archive of Americana architecture. [BV]

Spend some time listening this weekend: Designed this Way explores design in India. [BV]


Observed | September 13

Goodbye to bits and atoms. Uber has rebranded for the second time in less than three years. (via James I. Bowie) [BV]


Observed | September 12

Congrats to Michael Bierut + Jessica Helfand! The Design of Business | The Business of Design was named one of the 15 best graphic design podcasts. [BV]

How the hardware store orders things, neighborhoods, and material worlds. [BV]


Observed | September 11

“Most pleasant to the ear”: W. E. B. Du Bois’s itinerant intellectual soundscapes. [BV]


Observed | September 10

Anatomy of an AI System. (via Blake Eskin) [BV]


Observed | September 07

Laugh and the world laughs with you. But not everyone LOLs. How people around the world laugh online. [BV]

What colors define historical periods? Color Leap creates color palettes from 2000 BC to the 1960s. (via Blake Eskin) [BV]


Observed | September 06

Inside America’s abandoned theaters: the curtains have been called. [BV]


Observed | September 05

Ken Kocienda: “I invented the iPhone’s autocorrect. Sorry about that, and you’re welcome.” [BV]

How magazine cover design may be more important than ever. (via James I. Bowie) [BV]

The Cooper Hewitt received the London Design Biennale 2018 Emotional States Medal for “Face Values”, curated by Ellen Lupton. Our very own Jessica Helfand is one of the participating artists. Congratulations all! [BV]


Observed | August 31

In Helsinki, a new design museum opens underground. [BV]

From schools to sand piles: In her new book, critic Alexandra Lange tracks how design has shaped kids and kids have shaped design. [BV]


Observed | August 30

Integral thinking: design in four dimensions. [BV]

With ‘bookstagramming’ becoming a force in marketing, are designers making covers more colourful, bolder and cleaner, to stand out on our screens? [BV]


Observed | August 28

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints faces a divinely inspired rebranding challenge. (via James I. Bowie) [BV]

“When we talk about queering design pedagogy we need to talk about reproduction(s).” [BV]


Observed | August 27

A look at how to design for senior citizens: both in the macro scale of cities and the small scale of dwellings. [BV]

With her elegant 3-D subway schematics Candy Chan joins a long line of graphic designers and artists who have tried to explore—and explain—mass transit systems through visuals. [BV]


Observed | August 24

An ode to the color gray. [BV]


Observed | August 23

7 reasons the design industry may have forgotten Yves Béhar. [BV]

In the fight for net neutrality: Verizon under fire for ‘throttling’ firefighters’ data in California blaze. [BV]


Observed | August 22

Your afternoon moment of zen: delicate paper robots. [BV]

The video game soda machine project is obsessively cataloging video game “pop” culture. [BV]


Observed | August 21

Cartographers, rejoice. The world’s newest, most gloriously designed maps. [BV]



Jobs | September 20